Aranjuez Pro by Sudtipos

Aranjuez Pro by Sudtipos

Aranjuez is the latest Koziupa and Paul adventure. This time, they max out on calligraphic art deco, then add a healthy dose of the thick-and-thin mantra that’s been so trendy for quite a few years now. The result is neo-psychedelia in an upright cross-breed of pseudo-wood deco and ornamental calligraphy, complete with alternates, swashes, endings, playful contrast treatments, and even background possibilities. This font is quite expressive, and its elegance is meant to be shown prominently. So use it for packaging, book covers, or wherever the message needs to be delivered clearly and with a precisely controlled touch of class.

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Sudtipos – Piedra Free Font

Sudtipos - Piedra Free Font

The world may seem cartoonish to you, pilgrim, but the funnies ain’t really that funny. The Flintstones are so last century. The Hulks are in, and they’re here to stay. Piedra is the rocky, fear-inducing face of galvanized triceps and überchiseled jawlines. Be intimidated, be very intimidated. You don’t believe it? Just push the stylistic alternates button and see it disregard the laws and spit pebbles on the sidewalk. Then run to the hills if you want to live.

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Sudtipos – Mrs Sheppards Free Font

Sudtipos - Mrs Sheppards Free Font

The Charles Bluemlein Script Collection is an intriguing reminder of the heady days of hand lettering and calligraphy in the United States. From the early 1930s through World War II, there were about 200 professional hand letterers working in New York City alone. This occupation saw its demise with the advent of photo lettering, and after digital typography, became virtually extinct. The odd way in which the Bluemlein scripts were assembled and created – by collecting different signatures and then building complete alphabets from them – is a fascinating calligraphic adventure. Because the set of constructed designs looked nothing like the original signatures, fictitious names were assigned to the new script typefaces. The typeface styles were then showcased in Higgins Ink catalogs.

Alejandro Paul and Sudtipos bring the Bluemlein scripts back to life in a set of expanded digital versions, reflecting the demands of today’s designer. Extreme care has been taken to render the original scripts authentically, keeping the fictitious names originally assigned to them by Bluemlein.

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Sudtipos – Mr De Haviland Free Font

Sudtipos - Mr De Haviland Free Font

The Charles Bluemlein Script Collection is an intriguing reminder of the heady days of hand lettering and calligraphy in the United States. From the early 1930s through World War II, there were about 200 professional hand letterers working in New York City alone. This occupation saw its demise with the advent of photo lettering, and after digital typography, became virtually extinct. The odd way in which the Bluemlein scripts were assembled and created – by collecting different signatures and then building complete alphabets from them – is a fascinating calligraphic adventure. Because the set of constructed designs looked nothing like the original signatures, fictitious names were assigned to the new script typefaces. The typeface styles were then showcased in Higgins Ink catalogs.

Alejandro Paul and Sudtipos bring the Bluemlein scripts back to life in a set of expanded digital versions, reflecting the demands of today’s designer. Extreme care has been taken to render the original scripts authentically, keeping the fictitious names originally assigned to them by Bluemlein.

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Sudtipos – Mr Dafoe Free Font

Sudtipos - Mr Dafoe Free Font

The Charles Bluemlein Script Collection is an intriguing reminder of the heady days of hand lettering and calligraphy in the United States. From the early 1930s through World War II, there were about 200 professional hand letterers working in New York City alone. This occupation saw its demise with the advent of photo lettering, and after digital typography, became virtually extinct. The odd way in which the Bluemlein scripts were assembled and created – by collecting different signatures and then building complete alphabets from them – is a fascinating calligraphic adventure. Because the set of constructed designs looked nothing like the original signatures, fictitious names were assigned to the new script typefaces. The typeface styles were then showcased in Higgins Ink catalogs.

Alejandro Paul and Sudtipos bring the Bluemlein scripts back to life in a set of expanded digital versions, reflecting the demands of today’s designer. Extreme care has been taken to render the original scripts authentically, keeping the fictitious names originally assigned to them by Bluemlein.

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Sudtipos – Miss Fajardose Free Font

Sudtipos - Miss Fajardose Free Font

The Charles Bluemlein Script Collection is an intriguing reminder of the heady days of hand lettering and calligraphy in the United States. From the early 1930s through World War II, there were about 200 professional hand letterers working in New York City alone. This occupation saw its demise with the advent of photo lettering, and after digital typography, became virtually extinct. The odd way in which the Bluemlein scripts were assembled and created – by collecting different signatures and then building complete alphabets from them – is a fascinating calligraphic adventure. Because the set of constructed designs looked nothing like the original signatures, fictitious names were assigned to the new script typefaces. The typeface styles were then showcased in Higgins Ink catalogs.

Alejandro Paul and Sudtipos bring the Bluemlein scripts back to life in a set of expanded digital versions, reflecting the demands of today’s designer. Extreme care has been taken to render the original scripts authentically, keeping the fictitious names originally assigned to them by Bluemlein.

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Sudtipos – Herr Von Muellerhoff Free Font

Sudtipos - Herr Von Muellerhoff Free Font

The Charles Bluemlein Script Collection is an intriguing reminder of the heady days of hand lettering and calligraphy in the United States. From the early 1930s through World War II, there were about 200 professional hand letterers working in New York City alone. This occupation saw its demise with the advent of photo lettering, and after digital typography, became virtually extinct. The odd way in which the Bluemlein scripts were assembled and created – by collecting different signatures and then building complete alphabets from them – is a fascinating calligraphic adventure. Because the set of constructed designs looked nothing like the original signatures, fictitious names were assigned to the new script typefaces. The typeface styles were then showcased in Higgins Ink catalogs.

Alejandro Paul and Sudtipos bring the Bluemlein scripts back to life in a set of expanded digital versions, reflecting the demands of today’s designer. Extreme care has been taken to render the original scripts authentically, keeping the fictitious names originally assigned to them by Bluemlein.

Continue reading